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Light Work Gallery

Syracuse University
316 Waverly Ave.
Syracuse, NY 13244
Phone: 315-443-1300
info@lightwork.org
Website: www.lightwork.org
Light Work Gallery is on Facebook     Light Work Gallery is on Twitter

Hours: Sunday-Friday, 10am-6pm



Light Work Gallery Coming Events

Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 17, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 17, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 18, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 18, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 19, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 19, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, April 20, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, April 20, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 21, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 21, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 22, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 22, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 23, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 23, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 24, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, April 24, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 25, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, April 25, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 26, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, April 26, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, April 27, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, April 27, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 28, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, April 28, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 29, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, April 29, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 30, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, April 30, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 1, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 1, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 2, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 2, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 3, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 3, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, May 4, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, May 4, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 5, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 5, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 6, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 6, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 7, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 7, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 8, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 8, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 9, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 9, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 10, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 10, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, May 11, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Saturday, May 11, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 12, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Sunday, May 12, 2024, 1:00 PM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 13, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Monday, May 13, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 14, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Tuesday, May 14, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 15, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Wednesday, May 15, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 16, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Thursday, May 16, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


Highlights from the Light Work Collection: Dawoud Bey

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 17, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

Curated from our collection, Light Work is pleased to present a selection from two of Dawoud Bey's photographic projects: An American Project and Embracing Eatonville.

Black-and-white images from An American Project, made in Syracuse in 1985 during his artist residency, chronicle the community and history of the city. Embracing Eatonville was a photographic survey of Eatonville, FL — the oldest Black-incorporated town in the United States — that featured work by Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, and was exhibited at Light Work in 2003. Bey made color photographs of high school students combining their portraits with text sharing personal hopes, fears, and dreams.


Sophia Chai: Character Space

Save to Google calendar  Save to desktop calendar    Friday, May 17, 2024, 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM


Light Work Gallery
316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse University, Syracuse

In 1987, Chai immigrated to New York City from South Korea as a teenager without knowing English. Looking back, she has described that experience as feeling untethered to any internal compass that she could use to navigate her place in a new country with a new language. She visually explains these experiences to us by reinterpreting the Korean language's characters in photographs that enable us to see the contradictions of visual and verbal communication. Her images rest in the space between intellect and intuition. Chai's curiosity about the interior space of her tool — the large format camera, comparable to the interior space of a mouth — leads to the idea of the camera obscura, a darkened room with a small opening to the world.


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